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<Keith Carlson>
posted
IN MEMORIAM
Eloise Heller Cherry


ACC Bulletin May/June 1984

“Eloise Cherry died in her 77th year at the Presbyterian Hospital in San Francisco on Saturday, March 17, as the result of complications following surgery for cancer. She is survived by her husband, Guy and her daughter, Jill Graham.

The American Chesapeake Club in particular but also Eloise’s multitude of friends interested in retrievers and field trials, bench, obedience and the sport of dogs in general have all suffered a very real loss by her passing. She became prominent as a fancier of Chesapeakes early in the 1950’s. Her Storm Cloud II and Sasnakra Sassy gained bench championships and companion dog degrees in 1953 and 1954. Nelgard’s Baron won his Amateur Field Championshp in 1958, which was the year of the publication of the first of her several books on Chesapeakes, “The Chesapeake Bay Retriever”, published by the American Chesapeake Club.

Throughout the almost thirty years since 1955 Eloise had been an enthusiastic breeder and an indefatigable booster of Chesapeakes as well as a dedicated and fierce competitor on the bench and in the field with them. Who will soon forget Baron’s son, Dual and Amateur Field Champion Baron’s Tule Tiger and Tiger’s son, Dual and Amateur Field Champion Tiger’s Cub? Both of these dogs were bred and exhibited by Eloise and have been a strong influence in the development of the breed.

On top of all this, Eloise has held down just about every job and every title there is in the American Chesapeake Club, from President to Treasurer to Editor of the Bulletin to Field Trial Chairman, Field Trial Judge, and so on and so on. Just as she was a fierce competitor in the show ring and at trials, she was a formidable fighter for that she felt was right. She was responsible for a number of revisions of the Club’s By-Laws, selling them to the membership and obtaining the concurrence of the American Kennel Club. Similarily, Eloise was never afraid to mobilize a movement within the American Chesapeake Club to elect officers whom she felt were competent and to replace any who did not live up to her standards. Thus, at times, controversy seemed to whirl around her.

This side of Eloise was one that nobody who really knew her could fail to admire and respect, but there was another side too, and this was one you could not fail to love. The same quality that made her so successful with the Chesapeakes, made her a wonderful companion in the hunting field where she was so competent and tireless partner.

But Eloise’s essential quality was one of love, friendship and a glorious sense of humor. In this latter regard, she could laugh at herself without rancor of any kind. My wife, Louise, and I spent many days together with her at trials, and with Rex Carr over the years. To the world, Eloise was a truly fine handler and competitor, but in the presence of Rex, Eloise always retained to herself something of the attitude of a slightly recalcitrant school child. I savor with joy the time Eloise was handling Cub in a trial, and she was on line for a test which combined a couple of marks and a blind. Cub did the marks and Eloise lined him up and sent him on the blind and then began to pat herself and feel in her pockets with increasing agitation. I realized she had neglected to put on her whistle and took mine off and handed it to her. She put it on without taking her eyes off the dog and said simply “Don’t tell Rex”!

During the many years when we attended the same field trials, Eloise’s eyes began to bother her, particularly driving at night. I was afflicted with an almost identical problem. Also Eloise had a rather unreliable sense of direction. As a result we would drive the long distances involved, in tandem, with Louise driving our car in front and Eloise following behind, with me alternating as a sort of useless passenger between them. There was one sure thing on these trips and that was that Eloise was not going to get left behind. It was an exhilarating and at times frightening experience in traffic to be in Eloise’s car, skipping red lights and switching lanes wth irate people blowing horns. The fact that we survived was a tribute to her nerve and skill.

Anyone who had the pleasure of staying in Eloise’s house or attending one of the buffet dinners she would give there when the Chesapeake Specialty Trial was close enough to her lovely house in Sonoma, knows what a gracious hostess Eloise was. She was a wonderfully generous provider too, and would arrive at training sessions and at trials with an array of foods which she would distribute so generously-and it was a wonderful change from the fare so common on these occaisions. Many of us have shared with her the great salads she would conjure up, the dungeness crabs and other delicacies that it was difficult to imagine where in her dog truck they could have been stored.

Finally, and typically, Eloise was always generous with her love and friendship. One way she had of letting us know that she was remembering us, between visits, was to send us marked catalogues from the various trials she attended. I know she kept a number of her friends informed in this way. Not many days before she died we got a letter from Pat Ross, who had been with her at the hospital. Pat let us know how bad things were and enclosed in her letter, at Eloise’s request, some marked catalogues.

We will all miss this remarkable friend more than one can really express. Our thoughts and our sympathy are with Guy and Jill.”

August Belmont
ACC Bulletin May/June 1984



“It was way back when; to be exact the year 1950. The place was Klamath Falls, Oregon and the occasion, the Shasta-Cascade Retriever Trial.

I eagerly looked for some other lonely person who also might be brazen enough to run a Chesapeake in a licensed retriever trial.

Fortunately, I saw a giant of a brown dog who was dragging a most attractive and immaculately dressed lady around the trial grounds. The dog’s name was Storm Cloud II and the charming lady’s name was Eloise Cherry. That meeting started a close friendship that was to last until her unfortunate death last month.

Eloise loved the Chesapeake breed and did everything in her power to promote the breed. She produced more and better dogs, constantly striving to do even better. Not just for herself but for all who would listen and try.

She truly felt that the Chessy was the true all-around dog and worked accordingly. She showed on the bench; competed in obedience, and fought the field trial battles to a standstill. She had tremendous success in all fields of endeavor as the record books will so attest.

Eloise was a tireless and energetic trainer especially in the retriever trial world. She campaigned her dogs all over the U.S. and Canada. No one was a more fierce and determined competitor. The A.C.C. was fortunate to have had such a fine standard bearer!

Mrs. Cherry led a very full life and contributed to many charities, both with her time and money. She was a most generous and loving person.

To me and to many of her life-long friends, Eloise Heller Cherry was the epitomy of Class.

We shall miss her very much.”

John C. Lundy
ACC Bulletin May/June 1984



“About two weeks before Eloise passed away I talked to her on the phone. She was in the hospital really suffering but we had a wonderful chat and at the end of our conversation she said she would be leaving the hospital in a few days and would be up to see me in about two weeks. I sensed that she wouldn’t make it but typically of her she would not yield to the outcome.

Within me her indomitable spirit will never die.

Eloise was an achiever. She had a fierce compelling drive to accomplish things. She wouldn’t sit still and she had a constitution of endless ambition and activity. She was full of fire and anything with a tremendous spirit would charm her.

Eloise distinguished herself as an extravagant individual with endless tokens of remembrance. She overflowed with appreciation and would never overlook a favor no matter how seemingly insignificant. She was a harsh one but equally thoughtful.

In order to get a point across to her onetime to really make her bear down I told her she was nothing but a willy nilly amateur. She hauled off and lambasted me with a gulf stick. She wanted to be remembered as the toughest one on the lot. And she was. The two toughest animals I ever trained were Eloise and a mule called Vinegar.

During a horse show at the Cow Palace in San Francisco a professional deliberately forced Eloise’s horse into the rail and damaged her knee. That only disposed of Eloise until her knee healed and she could ride again. In preparation for her next competition against the tough pros she tucked a long hat pin from grandma into her riding boot. The first horse ridden by a professional that got close to her this time . . .was jabbed with that hat pin. The professionals learned to respect her.

Eloise was a champion of the underdog and real outspoken about it.

There was class of dignity in Eloise.

Nobody would go hungry with Eloise on the spot.

Eloise and I were poles apart in many ways but I admired, and respected and loved her. It was a privilege working with Eloise for about 25 years.”

Rex Carr
ACC Bulletin May/June 1984
 
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Thanks for the history. I knew she was the woman who trained with Rex Carr with Chessies.


"Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it."
CH Silvercreek Murray Samuel (Murray) CGC, WDQ, MH *** 2/16/00 - 12/26/12
Westwind Whispering Cove (Larry) WDQ, MH *** (Murray's Son)
LPK Delaware River Whispering Cove** (Savage Sam, Son of FC Chester MH)
Westwind Whispering Cove Jay **(Murray's grandson, Larry's son)
 
Posts: 2470 | Location: New Haven, Ct. U.S.A. | Registered: Fri May 30 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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To say that this woman was a Giant in the Retriever World would be putting it lightly. I never met her, but heard stories of her and her dogs from folks who respected and admired her as a person and as a handler.

Marty
 
Posts: 585 | Location: Hernando Ms. USA | Registered: Sat July 20 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Eloise, or Mrs Heller as I referred to her, was just as tough & fierce a competitor as she was a kind considerate lady. My father bought me my first CBR from Eloise and from that time on I was on her list. I still have some of those "marked up catalogs" that Auggie Belmont referred to in his write-up. She would take the time to write this kid telling not only what she was doing but wanting to know how I was doing with my dog. She went as far as having me stay in her house, and driving my dog and I to trials and to Rex's during the summer of'69.
Be it CBRs, guide dogs, hunting,horses,tennis, or people when she committed she was in 100%. I am privileged to have known her.

Tim
 
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Keith, the memorials to Eloise brought back some very fond memories. My first encounter with Eloise was at the first training day my (ex) husband and I attended at Baronland Kennels with our Baron’s Sandy Bay in 1974. We had barely arrived when 3 ladies approached us and wanted to know who we were, who are bitch was, where we got her and after oooing and aahing over, they told us they hoped we would consider doing something with her as she was very nice! The three ladies were none other than Eloise, Nancy Lowenthal, & Helen Fleischmann. That was the beginning of many trips to Baronland that I have fond memories of, and of Eloise, and the long road we embarked on with our Sandy.

As I’ve mentioned before, I attended the ACC National Specialty in Pescadero in 1979 (or 1980), and took my young Sam Hill along for a chaperon. Eloise was one of many notables who was also there, and she made it a point to stay in touch with me during the three days I was there. On the last day, she asked me if we could get together the following week in Santa Rosa for lunch and so I could take photographs of her Ch. Cub’s Terrific Thor with the trophies that she/he won that weekend. We met at a park near the restaurant where I took a lot of pictures, then Eloise said she wanted to take a picture of me with Thor so I would have it in my memory book....and she did. It's with all my other "famous" dog pics from that field trial that I will post when I get the album unburied! At lunch she asked me if I enjoyed myself at the field trial and hoped nobody bothered me as she noticed two guys were kind of following me around all weekend. She said she told everyone that I was her neice so thei would leave me alone! I thought that was too cute.

Eloise also wrote the foreward for my "History of the CBR by Pedigree" -- matter of fact, she and Nancy Lowenthal are who encouraged me to put it together as a collection and publish it -- and I did all the pedigree research and compilation for the pedigrees that appear in her "Complete Chesapeake Bay Retriever" published by Howell House and I was given an honorary mention in her credits at the front of the book.

For one reason or other, I was frequently out at Baronland, trained with her a number of times, and after the death of her daughter Jill 3 or 4 years ago, I acquired the Baronland Kennel sign that sat at the entrance to her Sonoma estate and some of her beautiful silver field trial trophies.

Those are just some of the things that were particularly notable in my friendship with Eloise. She was a great lady and went out of her way to mentor many people coming into the breed. Apparently she could also be a real Bear to others if she didn't like them!! She died on March 17, 1984, a date that I will always remember and not just because it was St. Patrick's Day.

Kent, the article you printed above is great, but for some reason I can't read the right hand column on either page. I thought perhaps it was my computer at work, but it's also not accesable on my computer here at home. Any way to rescan it smaller?


Kathy Miller
Sandy Oak Chesapeakes
www.sandyoakcbr.com
 
Posts: 2477 | Location: Sebastopol, CA | Registered: Tue December 04 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is what I like about this forum every once in awhile someone will post something about our Peakes. and the people that made them a part of history, it is my loss for not meeting a great lady like Eloise Heller Cherry. Thank you for sharing some of her history. Marvin Calhoun


Back,Bbbback,bbbbbback, dang do what you want
 
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<Keith Carlson>
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Tim, Kathy and Kent, thanks for sharing those memories of Eloise. Please share any photos you may have when time permits.

A very fascinating and colorful woman who certainly gained the respect of a lot of people.

Keith
 
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I have a picture of a women running bear cub I'm wondering if that is her?


"Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it."
CH Silvercreek Murray Samuel (Murray) CGC, WDQ, MH *** 2/16/00 - 12/26/12
Westwind Whispering Cove (Larry) WDQ, MH *** (Murray's Son)
LPK Delaware River Whispering Cove** (Savage Sam, Son of FC Chester MH)
Westwind Whispering Cove Jay **(Murray's grandson, Larry's son)
 
Posts: 2470 | Location: New Haven, Ct. U.S.A. | Registered: Fri May 30 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Very cool stuff. Thanks for sharing.

Damon
 
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dogapple
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Amid all the applauding of Eloise by her friends and proteges, we shouldn't loose sight of the fact that there was another side of the woman--her contributions to the breed were important, but not always positive.


Tom
 
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Keith, thanks for posting this information on this special Chesapeake breeder and handler.
Our first Chessie was a "Cub" grandchild and Nancy and Les Lowenthal introduced us to Eloise. She was like the breed - unique - one of a kind. I remember marshalling a WD stake once where Eloise and her husband, Guy, were judging. What a hoot to listen to them!
Charlie Sambrailo was a dear friend to Eloise and Helen Fleischmann. The ladies did not always agree, but Charlie kept everything on an even keel.
What a privilege it was to have known these "larger than life" folks who were so dedicated to our breed.


Pat Puwal
 
Posts: 1528 | Location: Roanoke, Virginia, USA | Registered: Fri April 04 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Eloise wrote 4 books on the Chesapeake Bay Retriever. The first three were published by The American Chesapeake Club and the last one was published by Howell House.

Periodically the books will come up on e-bay, or ABE books, or Amazon.com and are worth purchasing if you can afford to.

The first book "A History of the Chesapeake Bay Retriever" was published by ACC in 1959. It has a picture in brown tones of Ch. Sasnakra Sassy CD on the front of the book, and a color insert of a lovely print of FC Dilwyne Montauk Pilot on the inside cover. I was fortunate to have acquired the 11 x 14 print that she had it done from, along with some history on the dog that was attached to the back of the print. Some of the contributors of this book were M.E. "Snuffy" Beliveau, Anthony Bliss, Dr. Miles Thomas, Ed Fleischmann, Augie Belmont, William Hoard, & Janet Horn, Dr. John Lundy

The second book also entitled "The History of the Chesapeake Bay Retriever" was published by ACC in 1967, and picks up on the history of many notable chesapeakes in our breed where the 1959 book left off. The cover print on that is none other than the same one that appeared in color in the 1959 book of the copy of the painting by Edwin Magargee of FC Dilwyne Montauk Pilot. Some of the chapter contributors were William Hoard Jr., August Belmont, Phil Gagnon, Millie Buchholz, Janet Horn and Dr. John Lundy.

The third book is titled "Our Chesapeakes". The cover is a reproduction of an absolutely gorgeous oil painting of Dual Ch. & AFC Tiger's Cub CD that was done by Tom Quinn of Lab field trial fame for Eloise. Alex Starr now has this gorgeous painting after I got a call about three years ago from a friend who told me that the daughter of a famous Chesapeake person had just died, her entire estate was being sold, and among some of the more notable items was this paining of Cub. It was Eloise's daughter Jill Graham, and the sale was local, so I went down there, had to buy the painting, along with some other things I felt were worth saving, and Alex acquired the painting from me as it was way too big for my small house. But I digress....this last book was published by ACC in 1977, and picks up where the previous book left off.

The last book Eloise Edited was The Howell House Book, "The Complete Chesapeake Retriever" which did not contain any of the lists of titled and OFA dogs as did the ACC books, but it picked up on the history and famous dogs in the breed where the last ACC book left off. That book has a colored picture of Ch. Cub's Terrific Thor*** on the front cover.

Since then Janet Horn of Eastern Waters Chesapeaks, now deceased, along with her husband Dan Horn, produced "The New Complete Chesapeake Bay Retriever" for Howell House which updated Eloise's book. And Dyane Baldwin has since updated the ACC books with an edition that I believe is still available through ACC.

All of the books have fantastic pictures and histories of many of the 'famous' dogs and owners and are all worth adding to one's collection.....but they are pricey the older they get.


Kathy Miller
Sandy Oak Chesapeakes
www.sandyoakcbr.com
 
Posts: 2477 | Location: Sebastopol, CA | Registered: Tue December 04 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Tom Cox:
Amid all the applauding of Eloise by her friends and proteges, we shouldn't loose sight of the fact that there was another side of the woman--her contributions to the breed were important, but not always positive.


are you referring to her 'fondness' of 'rough' dogs? the 2x4 mentality?

Juli


________________
Chessies are kinda like potato chips, you know you can't have just one.

Skyview Chesapeakes

 
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dogapple
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are you referring to her 'fondness' of 'rough' dogs? the 2x4 mentality

Partially. Also partly to her shameless pimping for her own dogs and putting down of those of others, such as FC/AFC Copper Topper der Wunderbar, so that some fine dogs didn't get bred much if at all and our gene pool got dangerously narrowed as a result. Instead of she, the Fleischmans, and Augie Belmont breeding the best to the best, each seemed intent on proving his or her line was best by linebreeding to their own. Eloise was also shameless in pushing for placements for her dogs in the old "you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours" fashion. Cub in particular was a frequent beneficiary of this; one of the Chesapeake people who competed regularly against him was still sore years later and once said to me "Cub was a common cur." I know that none of this will sit well with her old friends and admirers, but I think it true nonetheless.


Tom
 
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Partially. Also partly to her shameless pimping for her own dogs and putting down of those of others, such as FC/AFC Copper Topper der Wunderbar, so that some fine dogs didn't get bred much if at all and our gene pool got dangerously narrowed as a result. Instead of she, the Fleischmans, and Augie Belmont breeding the best to the best, each seemed intent on proving his or her line was best by linebreeding to their own. Eloise was also shameless in pushing for placements for her dogs in the old "you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours" fashion. Cub in particular was a frequent beneficiary of this; one of the Chesapeake people who competed regularly against him was still sore years later and once said to me "Cub was a common cur." I know that none of this will sit well with her old friends and admirers, but I think it true nonetheless.


Tom, I think a lot of this goes on everywhere back then and today with many people. I think we all tend to toot our own horns, and you hear of the politcal cliques all the time in every venue. I'm not poo-pooing what you say is true or not, but it happens and seems to be more obvious with high profile people.

Bottom line is that Eloise did a lot for the breed. I don't think it's fair to dredge up negatives whether it be Eloise or anyone else after they are long gone.

What's the point?


Kathy Miller
Sandy Oak Chesapeakes
www.sandyoakcbr.com
 
Posts: 2477 | Location: Sebastopol, CA | Registered: Tue December 04 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tom what you say is true. Eloise did know how play the game to her benefit the same as the Fleishmans and the Belmonts.

In that era of CBRs it was the Mount Joys, the Atom Bobs and the Baronlands all competing for top dog. Eloise and Helen Flieshman were friends but they would both accuse the other of getting bench titles by entering a bunch of their "ugly dogs" against the one they wanted to win to get points faster.
They were competitive people. They put in a tremendous effort and wanted/expected to win and did.
The sum total of all of their work allowed this breed to survive to today's FT CBR.
You will be hard pressed to find many competitive all-age CBRs in the last 40 years that do not go back to a Nelgard's Baron or Atom Bob.

Tim
 
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dogapple
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What's the point?

It is a cautionary tale. She didn't walk on water, and glorifying her as if she did is to be false to the past. As a professional historian I can't stand that sort of ancestor worship. Sure, our pedigrees are full of her stuff, but as one of her competitors who is still around puts it "In one generation we went from being truly competitive to having slow, mean dogs." It is a hole that has taken years to dig out of. We are still paying the price.


Tom
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Kathy Miller:
[QUOTE]Bottom line is that Eloise did a lot for the breed. I don't think it's fair to dredge up negatives whether it be Eloise or anyone else after they are long gone.
What's the point?


I, for one think it is good to know the good, bad and ugly. For the new folks it is very tough to get accurate, true information, let alone any information. As a breed with minority #'s playing the field games, the "bad" and "ugly" information will hopefully help to prevent the "bad" history from repeating itself (as already mentioned) and help the newer folks to understand why the breed is in the position it may be in or not be in and on the "right track". Just too many myths, mis-information, etc. out there as to why this breed is not more successful in the field games.
 
Posts: 215 | Location: Littleton, Colorado | Registered: Tue October 07 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<Keith Carlson>
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I don't agree with all of Tom's viewpoints but he is entitled to them. As it was then, it is still the same today, folks breeding Chesapeakes are real high on their own "lines", sometimes to a fault.

What I appreciate is the overall contribution to the Chesapeake breed that was made by Eloise and those of influence she associated within the retriever field trial world. And it is not a perfect "world" by any means, then or now. I have most of the books she put out about the Chesapeake Bay Retriever and still enjoy them immensely. They inspired me to develop an interest in field trials and owning Chesapeakes in the 1970's.

When was the last time you saw an article in the ACC Bulletin with someone with the stature and reputation of a Rex Carr? August Belmont? I even have a copy of an ACC Bulletin with an article about a Chesapeake field dog written by Mike Lardy in the 1980's.

Today, this breed could use a few of those prominent individuals like Eloise, Auggie Belmont, Rex Carr and John Lundy (and many others) from long ago (50's, 60's, 70's) to inspire newcomers who want to participate in field activities. We don't have enough people with their stature anymore.

Keith
 
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Originally posted by Kent Stokesberry:
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accuracy from a message board forum ? OK...but there is a high probability of errors ...


from some people, "yes" and some people,"no"


The simple reason John IMHO that Chesapeakes are not more successful in the field games is that not as many people run Peakes..... Pretty simple math if you look at the numbers.[/QUOTE]

I would agree with that statement and would add that today most folks have their dogs(Lab's) on a pro's truck and Peakes don't handle being on a pro's truck like Labs do, for the most part.
 
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